Christmas and the Theology of God

I’m currently in one of the last stretches of writing out the first volume of a systematic theology. This means I’m looking forward to writing out volume 2 on the doctrine of God. Who is God, and what does He reveal Himself to be? In this Christmas season, one of the things that I find interesting is that our messages and our writings are often not reflecting who God reveals Himself to be, but rather some sort of self projected image of what we aspire to be.

It has always amazed me that when you go to church during the Christmas season, instead of talking about the birth of Christ, the messages seem to surround the cross. Baby Jesus was just born, and now we’re already trying to kill Him. Whether we talk about the shepherds, the star and magi, the son who was promised to be born, or the baby in the manger, it all seems to revolve around the savior being crucified, and not around the savior being born. What we miss in this is that we neglect the message of hope. God is with us. Not because He died, but because He is alive. He is Emmanuel.

God has revealed Himself through many diverse ways. I’ve been thinking about this, because as I’m reading through the various theology books about God, I’m finding that most of the discussion revolves around His attributes, and not around God Himself. It’s like we think in order to describe someone we must explain what they look like. But God doesn’t explain Himself in this way. Instead, He says He is a husband, He is the God of Israel, He is merciful, He blesses to thousands of generations, but curses to only 3-4. God’s descriptions of Himself are not revolving around His attributes, but around the very core of who He is.

When Jesus was born, He reveals the character of God just as much as His crucifixion. He was born in a manger, because God has always identified with they who have no place to rest their head. The angels come to the shepherds, because God has always commanded that His shepherds would take care of their flocks, even when it is dark, even when it is night, and all around us is fear and trepidation. The humility of God is revealed in this: “Let this mind be in you which was also in Christ Jesus, who, being in the form of God, did not consider it robbery to be equal with God, but made Himself of no reputation, taking the form of a bondservant, and coming in the likeness of men.And being found in appearance as a man, He humbled Himself and became obedient to the point of death, even the death of the cross. Therefore God also has highly exalted Him and given Him the name which is above every name,10 that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, of those in heaven, and of those on earth, and of those under the earth, 11 and that every tongue should confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father.” 

God stripped off his outer garment, taking up the clothing of a servant of all, not finding equality with God something to be coveted, but rather cast aside His deity to become man. He took off that garment of glory in order to become one who had no excellency that humanity would find Him altogether glorious. He became human, and indeed even the servant of all, washing the feet of His creation, through the water of the Spirit, and through the eternal hope of the restoration of all things. Jesus’ birth is about the Kingdom of God. It is about how God has not abandoned us. It is about Israel restored, and Israel redeemed. It is about the eternal bliss that has always been available to us, ever since the “and God rested on the seventh day”, but we’ve always considered it something far away and outside and afterward.

This Christmas season, let us reconsider the birth of our savior. Let us take hold of these things, and instead of going straight to the cross, lets dwell here in the birth. Maybe when we can grasp some of these things, even with a mustard seed of faith, we might find Christmas to once again be revolutionary. May grace and peace be upon you all, amen.

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